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How to get the better of cyber-criminals

“The biggest threat posed by cyber-criminals today is their ability to remain undetected in the network for months, once they have bypassed perimeter defences,” he said. “New technologies and approaches like deception-based threat detection will be one of the techniques and investments that organisations will adopt to close this gap and strengthen overall defences.”

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BD and Attivo Partner to Thwart Cyberattacks

As medical devices incorporate connectivity, they provide greater opportunities for convenience, service, and information for consumers and companies, but also are increasingly vulnerable to cyber threats. In this environment, Attivo Networks and Becton, Dickinson and Co. (BD) have validated a deception solution for medical technology cybersecurity threats through a partnership bringing Attivo’s Botsink solution to a select number of BD devices. The two firms collaborated through BD’s Product Security Partnership Program and created “mirror-match decoy authenticity” software for some of BD’s devices, a method designed to redirect an attack from reaching important information or networks.

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Cybersecurity in 2018: broader scope of innovation and bigger venture dollars

Heightened attention to cybersecurity offensive countermeasures. Cybersecurity has been mostly defense-oriented, but this has never been sufficient. Moving forward, we will see more companies spring up along the lines of Attivo Networks, a leader in deception solutions. Attivo applies deception-based decoy and luring technologies within networks to misdirect attackers and deceive them into revealing themselves. (Disclosure: My firm has invested in Attivo.)

How Enterprises Can Better Combat Advanced Cyber Attacks

Another key way to restack the deck in favor of organizational victims of cyber breaches is for them to embrace an offensive, as well as defensive stance against threat actors. Among the interesting players in this space is Attivo Networks, a leader in deception solutions for cybersecurity defense. Attivo develops traps and lures – called “honey nets” – to attract an attacker, which can be a human or a bot or an advanced persistent threat. Then it locks up the perpetrator in quarantine within the system and records actions and details for forensic analysis.

Why Deception Technology Will Change The Game In Our Favor Against Cybercrime And Breaches

Then, I heard about Attivo and as one of the four CDM judges on our Infosec Awards from 2017, with them being one of our winners, receiving an overwhelming positive vote from the judges, I wanted to dig into what they are up to a little further and look at them within the purview of the Time-based Security model – could a solution like the Attivo ThreatDefendTM Deception and Response Platform actually deliver a way to slow down the breaches, because, frankly, we’re not yet going fast enough to stop them?

Uber Paid 20-Year-Old Florida Man $100,000 To Keep Quiet About Data Breach

A 20-year-old Florida man was responsible for the large data breach at Uber Technologies Inc last year and was paid by Uber to destroy the data through a so-called “bug bounty” program normally used to identify small code vulnerabilities, three people familiar with the events have told Reuters.

Uber announced on Nov. 21 that the personal data of 57 million users, including 600,000 drivers in the United States, were stolen in a breach that occurred in October 2016, and that it paid the hacker $100,000 to destroy the information. But the company did not reveal any information about the hacker or how it paid him the money.

Uber made the payment last year through a program designed to reward security researchers who report flaws in a company’s software, these people said. Uber’s bug bounty service – as such a program is known in the industry – is hosted by a company called HackerOne, which offers its platform to a number of tech companies.

Reuters was unable to establish the identity of the hacker or another person who sources said helped him. Uber spokesman Matt Kallman declined to comment on the matter.

Newly appointed Uber Chief Executive Dara Khosrowshahi fired two of Uber’s top security officials when he announced the breach last month, saying the incident should have been disclosed to regulators at the time it was discovered, about a year before.

It remains unclear who made the final decision to authorize the payment to the hacker and to keep the breach secret, though the sources said then-CEO Travis Kalanick was aware of the breach and bug bounty payment in November of last year.

More data records were lost or stolen in the first half of 2017 than all of 2016

918 data breaches led to 1.9 billion data records being compromised worldwide in the first half of 2017.

This October marked the 14th year of National Cyber Security Awareness Month(NCSAM), a series of events created as a collaborative effort between government and industry to ensure that all Americans have the resources they need to stay safer and more secure online. Even before last month’s Equifax and SEC breach announcements and Yahoo revising its report of a 2013 security incident to clarify that the event exposed every one of its three billion user accounts, that task – staying secure online – seemed overwhelming. Let’s look at the numbers.

EU looks to extra spending, diplomacy to bolster cyber security

BRUSSELS/FRANKFURT (Reuters) – The European Commission wants to bolster cyber security in the EU by increasing investment in technology, setting stricter consumer safeguards and stepping up diplomacy to deter attacks by other nations, among other measures.

The Commission is due to announce its proposals in a report later this month, a copy of which was obtained by Reuters on Wednesday. It also argues for greater national and law enforcement cooperation to halt incoming attacks.

The report calls for a short-term injection of additional EU spending to achieve both a critical mass of investment and overcome fragmentation within the region, calling a previous 2016 plan to spend 1.8 billion euros ($2.1 billion) by 2020 a “first step”.

Weebly Data Breach Affects 43 Million Customers

Weebly, a San Francisco-based company that has allowed more than 40 million people create websites with since 2007; will start sending notification letters to all of their customers on Thursday, informing them of a data breach that occurred eight months ago.

The breach, affecting 43,430,316 customers, happened February 2016, but the root cause remains unknown. The compromised database is just now coming to the public’s attention after an anonymous source sent it to LeakedSource.

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India experiences catastrophic cyberattack, 3.2 million debit card account details stolen

India is dealing with one of the worst data breaches ever to hit the country with as many as 3.2 million debit card details stolen from multiple banks and financial platforms.

On Thursday, the Economic Times reported that malware was used to compromise the Hitachi Payment Services platform, used to power India’s ATM, point-of-sale (PoS) systems and other financial transactions.

This infection then affected the State Bank of India (SBI), ICICI, Yes, Axis and HDFC, which are said to be the hardest hit. The Visa and Mastercard networks are also allegedly affected by the data breach — which took roughly six weeks to detect.

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