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IoT

Are You in Position to Avoid Being Held Hostage?

The continued addition of operational technology (OT) into connected networks is playing a key role in expanding the threat landscape. And unfortunately, today’s sophisticated hackers see the evolution as an opportunity to deploy new ways to attack manufactures. … To counter Ransomware 2.0, Attivo Networks recently announced new capabilities to its Endpoint Detection Net (EDN) …

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Ward off IoT attackers with deception

Attivo Networks has integrated its ThreatDefend platform based on deception technology into the Azure Security Center. … This should improve the detection rate and response time when attacking the Azure IoT Edge. Since IoT technology on the network edge (Intelligent Edge) is a common target for attackers, the service is intended to mitigate risks by …

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IoT devices as bait for cyber attackers

Attivo Networks has integrated its Deception technology-based ThreatDefend platform into the Microsoft Azure Security Center. … This further improves the detection rate and response time when attacking the Microsoft Azure IoT Edge service. Because Intelligent Edge is a common target for attackers, the Azure IoT Edge service actively addresses emerging cyber risks by using Attivo …

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Attivo Networks baits IoT attackers

Attivo Networks integrates its ThreatDefend platform into Microsoft IoT Edge … Attivo Networks has integrated its Deception technology-based ThreatDefend platform into the Microsoft Azure Security Center. This further improves the detection rate and response time when attacking the Microsoft Azure IoT Edge service. Because Intelligent Edge is a common target for attackers, the Azure IoT …

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Taking Charge of Cybersecurity in the Energy Industry

Delivering energy has centered on the fundamental tenant of being reliably available. As energy providers strive to maintain that availability, they all too often push security to the backburner. Many unsafe practices have fallen into place for the sake of speed and efficiency, including the use of default and shared passwords, open access, and little oversight. Many systems have been put into production and stayed in place well beyond the vendor’s intended support lifecycles. This situation has resulted in systems that are end-of-life, no longer receiving patches or updates despite known security flaws. Unfortunately, many organizations have also built security around the assumption of air-gapped networks, which is proving to be insufficient as more and more devices become interconnected.

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Why cybersecurity is lagging in utilities – and what to do about it

The energy space is a highly attractive target for cyberattacks, with potentially major repercussions. It is also an industry that is notoriously slow to adopt new advanced cybersecurity measures. The slowness of the industry in adopting new security solutions is evidenced by global utilities lagging behind aligning themselves with cybersecurity standards.

Securing IoT through deception

The momentum of IoT adoption is showing no signs of slowing, and with it comes increasingly material risk for both businesses and households. The quest for innovation has allowed for security to fall behind, and as a result, these devices have infiltrated our lives while creating an environment where attackers can exploit these solutions for anything from ransomware to extensive denial of service attacks, says Carolyn Crandall, chief deception officer at Attivo Networks.

Security controls must keep pace with internet-connected devices

Interconnected devices are becoming the standard across all facets of technology. We are seeing this in everything from smart cities to tea pots and toasters. New IoT devices are popping up daily, rapidly adding to the 23 billion that already exist. These devices are designed for availability, accuracy and efficient work. Unfortunately, unprecedented numbers of these devices are hitting the market with poor security access control and little to no management oversight, making them a prime target for cyberattack. The goal of an attack is to control the device, but more common and concerning are the new ways an attacker can use devices to gain access to corporate, medical or operational networks. As a result, organizations must change the way they approach their security controls. It is no longer feasible to assume a security team can find every endpoint device, much less secure them.

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