IoT

Attivo Networks Provides First Deception-based Threat Detection Platform for Internet of Things (IoT)

FREMONT, Calif., May 24, 2016— Attivo Networks®, the award-winning leader in deception for cyber security threat detection, today announced an expansion of the Attivo Deception Platform, which provides real-time threat detection and accelerated incident response, to now support the Internet of Thing (IoT) ecosystem. This new enhancement complements the existing Deception Platform that supports user networks, data centers, cloud and ICS-SCADA environments. “Gartner forecasts that 6.4 billion connected things will be in use worldwide in 2016, up 30 percent from 2015”[1], bringing a whole new set of cybersecurity risk and the need for real-time attack detection.

Attivo Networks

Attivo Networks Provides First Deception-based Threat Detection Platform for Internet of Things (IoT)

Attivo Networks today announced an expansion of the Attivo Deception Platform, which provides real-time threat detection and accelerated incident response, to now support the Internet of Thing (IoT) ecosystem. This new enhancement complements the existing Deception Platform that supports user networks, data centers, cloud and ICS-SCADA environments. “Gartner forecasts that 6.4 billion connected things will be in use worldwide in 2016, up 30 percent from 2015”, bringing a whole new set of cybersecurity risk and the need for real-time attack detection.

IoT a heaven for hackers

Those still finding it hard to envision the extent of the impact the Internet of Things’ (IoT) will have on the way people live and work should try this: imagine for a moment the reality of a life without internet connectivity or the existence of the World Wide Web. Do you feel anxious, stressed, fearful and insecure? In less than ten years’ time, we’re expected to already be irreversibly dependent on an IoT-enabled reality.

IoT Security: It’s All About the Process

Not long ago, nearly a thousand globally dispersed CCTV cameras were revealed to be enslaved to an IoT botnet for launching DDoS attacks. This news followed research indicating that several baby monitor products were laden with vulnerabilities exposing connected-home systems to a breach. And let’s not even get started on the YouTube Tea Kettle hack video.

These recent examples show how little effort is required for hackers to exploit unsecured devices, and they rightly renew fears about how the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT) is being outpaced by a rise in risks to user data, privacy and devices.

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