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Equifax under pressure after data breach update

Equifax is facing a fresh demand to disclose the full extent of last year’s data breach, following a report that it was bigger than previously disclosed.

The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported on Friday that cyber-thieves had accessed US citizens’ email addresses, tax ID numbers and more driver licence information than acknowledged earlier.

US Senator Elizabeth Warren is now demanding details of any other data the firm believes may have been stolen.

She wants a reply by the week’s end.

“As your company continues to issue incomplete, confusing, and contradictory statements and hide information from Congress and the public, it is clear that five months after the breach was publicly announced, Equifax has yet to answer this simple question in full: what was the precise extent of the breach?” the Democratic senator from Massachusetts wrote in a letter to the credit rating agency.

The WSJ said it was unclear how many of the 145.5 million Americans that the firm had previously said were affected by the breach, had had the additional information about them exposed.

The Atlanta, Georgia-based company, one of the biggest companies of its kind, had previously confirmed that social security numbers, birth dates and addresses had been compromised.

“We have complied with applicable notification requirements in the disclosure process,” the firm told the WSJ.

It added that it believed that the additional driver licence data exposed – which is reported to have involved issue dates and the states that granted them – was “extremely minimal”.

Data Breach Update: Equifax Fraud Alert Expiring – Now What?

Where does the time go? It’s already 2018 but we can’t just forget about all the things that happened in 2017. Like a massive data breach. You remember, the Equifax one that exposed the Social Security numbers, address and credit information for over 145 million people.

That means, more than half the country’s adult population had their personal information stolen. It’s been three months since we learned of the hack and you might be one of the many Americans who opted for the company’s fraud alert protection. Well, that protection is expiring and you need to figure out your next steps.

What happened?

In September, Equifax admitted a major hack to their system. Many people, in an effort to protect their information, placed fraud alert on their TransUnion, Equifax and Experian credit reports. The alert requires lenders to contact you to determine if any new credit application is valid.

It’s a good protection but, here’s the catch. The fraud alert expires every 90 days. So, if you got it in September when the breach first happened, you need to do it again in late December or early January. And, then you would need to do it again, and again.

So, there’s two other options. A credit freeze or a credit lock.

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